Cafe Matin

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Cafe / Food

Cafe hopping in Korea is a must. There are so many great coffee shops, each with their own individual style and aesthetic, it’s hard not to visit and enjoy what each establishment has to offer. Not only do these cafes’ take their style seriously ,but are also devoted in giving good coffee and a selection of brews to suit your taste. Cafe Matin does just that with its sleek industrial look and serving a fine collection of coffee drinks and desserts.

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Outside Cafe Matin

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I ordered the Busan latte and chocolate canele to share between with my fiance.

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Chocolate canele- look at those tiny forks!

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Their Busan latte was amazing *.*

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Neon lights are a thing in Korea….

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a touch of Scandinavia 

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Cafe Matin is a stunning place to relax and enjoy great coffee. Located in Seomyeon, it attracts a hip and young clientele and their dedication to coffee is clearly visible. Definitely check it out if your in the Busan area.

Address: Cafe Matin: 2F, 49 Dongcheon-Ro, Busanjin-gu

Instagram: @matincoffeeroasters

Lovesome Cafe

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Cafe / Travel

Lovesome is a pink paradise of a cafe, located in Jeonpo, Busan.  This cafe is another example of what is great about the Korean cafe scene, where it’s not only the drink that matters but also the aesthetic and making sure you get yourself that instagram worthy picture!

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pinkoholic

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Neon lights are a must!

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I ordered a hot sweet potato latte, something I needed on a cold rainy day. Their most popular drink is the pink latte, a two tone pink and white drink, which is worth the snap. The cafe also sells a selection of desserts as well.

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This is a cute cafe which ticks all the boxes for a typical Korean cafe and is especially catered for the female market.  I spent a relaxing time at the cafe and would definitely return again.

 

 

Japanese Bento Class at Atsuko’s Kitchen

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Food

Wouldn’t it be great to bring a colourful, nutritious lunch to work other than the same boring old farce of sandwiches? Japanese bento lunch boxes are an enticing piece of art that are not only visually appealing but healthy as well as super tasty. Bento’s are an everyday affair for the Japanese, they’re a convenient source of lunch for office workers and schoolchildren. There are also more elaborate forms of bento’s and seasonal one’s such as hanami bento, which are eaten in cohesion with the cherry blossom watching that takes place each spring in Japan.

The aim for me to join this class was to learn not only the art of Japanese cooking and bento but to kickstart a culinary revolution to my own lunch box that is healthy and satisfying for me. Taking the bento cooking class from Atsuko’s Kitchen, I learnt fool proof, everyday recipes and the philosophy behind the bento box.

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Tools for bento

Atsuko, who guided the lesson first gave us the basic introduction to the Japanese bento and the components needed for an everyday, enticing lunch. The main rules to a good bento is to have balanced dishes in terms of nutrition, taste, colour as well as cooking methods.

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The class was perfectly organised to make each of the recipes used for an everyday bento box, including:

Umesu Zuke (Ume flavoured pickled radish)

Saikyo Yaki (grilled miso marinated fish)

Tamago Yaki (rolled omelette)

Sticky rice

Yaki bitashi (fried & marinated vegetables)

Karaage chicken / tofu

Instant miso soup

Each recipe followed the element of a balanced meal, colours and different cooking methods.

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Making tamagoyaki- rolled omelette

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The finished product

Learning to make tamagoyaki (rolled omelette) was an interesting and challeging dish, where layers of beaten egg is fried and rolled into an omelette log and sliced.

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Ume pickled radish

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Making onigiri

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Making onigiri (rice balls) were effectively made using moulds and wrapped in nori (dried seaweed).

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Yaki bitashi- fried and marinated vegetables

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How to pack a bento

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Equally pleasing was arranging the bento box and how each dish complemented each other both in colour and taste.

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My own bento box

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Completed bento with onigiri, pickled radish, yaki bitashi, tamagoyki, salmon and karaage

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It was such a wonderful class and the easement of each dish proved how making bento and Japanese cooking in general is not at all hard. I was so proud of my bento box, making the dishes and how they each complemented one another so well. In addition, you’re provided to take the bento box as seen in the picture and recipe cards home, so they can be recreated again at your own leisure. But the beauty of bento is that you can create your own personal style and touch to your lunch and it doesn’t necessarily mean cooking only Japanese food, as long as the dishes are balanced, colourful and tasty, making bento is an easy fare.

Atsuko’s Kitchen is located 35 Charlotte Road in East London and holds various Japanese cooking lessons. Check out their website for more: http://www.atsukoskitchen.com/.

Overall this class has inspired me to bring my work lunch to a new level and incorporate Japanese cooking into my life, as well as assessing what is good and nutritious for me.

Thank you for reading.

 

 

Myeongran- jeot & Seaweed Pasta

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Recipe

The title of this dish is a mouthful but so delicious; that I feel a bit compelled to share this recipe that my lovely boyfriend made for me. Myeongran-jeot (명란젓) is salt fermented pollock roe and is one of many fermented food products used in Korean cuisine. Paired up with spaghetti and you’ve got a brilliant fusion dish that combines the best of both Eastern and Western cuisine in one bowl. Enjoy!

Recipe for Myeongran-Jeot & Seaweed Pasta

200g Spaghetti

3 cloves of garlic- peeled & sliced

100g Myeongran Jeot (Pollock roe)

100ml Olive oil

Black pepper

5 Dried seaweed sheets (or 100g shredded seaweed)

  1. Boil the spaghetti according to packet instructions in salted water. Once cooked, drain and set aside in a bowl with some oil to help stop the pasta from sticking.
  2. Meanwhile cut the roe sac in half, squeeze out and discard membrane.
  3. In a bowl, add the dried seaweed sheets and pour boiling water over. Make sure to drain any excess water. Doing this process will make the seaweed more manageable to combine with the pasta.
  4. In a medium sized frying pan, add the sliced garlic cloves,  100ml olive oil ( or enough to coat the pasta) and fry for a few minutes. Add the roe to the pan along with black pepper to taste. Be careful to not over cook the garlic.
  5. Add the cooked pasta and seaweed to the frying pan, mix until thoroughly coated.
  6. Decorate dish with some shredded seaweed and eat up!

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Moru Restaurant

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Food / Restaurant

Located on a quiet street, you will find a quaint and probably the most instagrammable restaurant in Busan. It’s not hard to see why, with its white tile facade and scattered plant pots, Moru Restaurant (모루 식당) will make you feel instantly transported to a back street in Tokyo. This is part of their appeal; that has attracted many young Koreans to dine (and take lots of photos!) here.

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Due to the restaurant’s popularity, I recommend coming an hour earlier before opening time, which is 12 o’clock. When we arrived, there were already a few eager customers  waiting!

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View from outside

The restaurant is a bit cramped with seating on two floors, we tip toed our way upstairs and patiently waited for our order. Moru Restaurant specialises in Japanese curry that is appetizing to the eye as well as your taste buds.

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Itadakimasu!

We ordered half & half curry, a mixture of vegetable & shrimp curry served  with cooked rice positioned in the middle, giving the dish an attractive touch. The curry was rich, creamy and mild in flavour; which is a big thumbs up for those who are not fans of spicy food.

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Chicken Karaage

We also ordered karaage, a Japanese style fried chicken dish, which tasted absolutely divine.

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Ice cream Melon Soda

Lastly, we finished our meal off with an ice cream melon soda, which was a novelty for me, but I was slurping away joyfully.

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Cute facade

I really enjoyed eating at Moru, it’s a cute, dreamy place that really focuses on making good curry. However, due to the restaurant’s popularity, you need a stroke of good luck and patience to eat here and is not a place you can easily eat as and when you want. Moru is opened daily from 12 to 8 in the evening, with break time for staff between 3 to 5. The restaurant is located near Jeonpo Station on Jeonpo cafe street, it’s a definite foodie hot spot not to be missed!

Thank you for reading & looking at my blog.

Misugaru & Orange Biscotti

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Food / Recipe

Misugaru & Orange Biscotti

Misugaru (미숫가루) is a traditional Korean powder that contains an array of grains.Such grains include, rice, soy beans, barley and corn to name a few, which are then roasted and grounded together, giving it a nutty, rich flavour. Misugaru  is commonly used in hot and cold drinks, for breakfast and is noted for its super healthy benefits.

I was lucky enough to be given a box of Misugaru from my boyfriend in Korea and decided to add this wonderful powder for baking and I have to admit it does give baked goods a filling, nutty flavour.

Although this ingredient is not a common product in the UK, it can be found in Asian stores and in particular Korean food stores.

Misugaru & Orange Biscotti Recipe:

200g Plain Flour

1 tsp Baking Powder

50g Misugaru flour

250g Sugar

1 or 2 Eggs, Beaten

Zest & juice of 1 Orange or Orange liqueur

100g Chopped nuts (I used almonds & pecan)

  1. Preheat oven to 170c/ 150c /gas 3 and line a large baking tray with parchment paper.
  2. In a bowl mix together flour, misugaru, sugar, baking powder and zest until evenly combined.
  3. Add juice of orange slowly, followed by the beaten egg until mixture forms into a soft dough. Add another egg if mixture is still dry.
  4. Lightly dust work surface with flour and knead mixture.
  5. Divide into two, and shape into 15 cm log.
  6. Place on baking tray and cook for 25 minutes.
  7. Once cooked, take out of oven and let it cool slightly.
  8. With a serrated knife cut the biscuit into diagonal slices.
  9. Place back into the oven and cook for around 7 mins. Then turn them over and cook for another 7 mins.  Place on a wire rack and cool down.

Variation: Make this vegan by replacing egg with vegetable  or coconut oil.

 

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Copenhagen

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Travel

Copenhagen- Scandinavia’s cool, laid back city was my destination for a few days this spring break. The city greeted me with colourful streets, minimal architecture and an array of hipster cafes’. God fornøjelse!

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The Round Tower

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The city skyline

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Colourful, quaint streets

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Copenhagen eats and cafes’

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Iconic Nyhavn

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Amager Strand Park

 

Thank you for reading